unknown R&B songs

The Killer Meters-Freak/Black Mountain

Holy great new music, Batman! I just discovered this band while doing a little spot of Youtube-ing, and, um….whoa. They’re dropping big stinky funk bombs all over the UK and EU. Check ‘em out at http://www.myspace.com/thekillermetersfunk and send some US love their way!

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Posted in Unknown Songs on December 13th, 2010 by eddielehwald –

Mark Morrison-Return Of The Mack

Oh damn! We’re going back in time today, campers! If you were alive in the mid-nineties, at some point you’ve probably gotten DOWN to this song.

Mark Morrison has-even for a R&B artist-a pretty impressive criminal record as well as a Mohammed Ali-like talent for talking himself up. A few years ago he was jailed for-get this-hiring an impersonator to fulfill his community service while he went on tour! How awesome is that?

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Posted in Forgotten Music on December 9th, 2010 by eddielehwald –

Al Green – Take Me To The River

Most people know “Take Me To The River” as a Talking Heads song. It was actually written by Al Green and Teenie Hodges for Al Green’s 1974 album Al Green Explores Your Mind. The song was not released as an Al Green single, but passed off to Syl Johnson who brought it up to #48 on the US Hot 100 chart in 1975. The Talking Heads didn’t cover “Take Me To The River” until their 1978 album – More Songs About Buildings and Food.

Here is the Al Green version:

and the Syl Johnson version:

and for those who don’t know, The Talking Heads:
:

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Posted in Forgotten Music, Underplayed Music on November 28th, 2010 by Tony Amoyal –

Little Feat-Rock ‘n Roll Doctor

If you were one of those lucky few in Atlantic City for Phish this past weekend, you got to hear Little Feat’s ‘Waiting For Columbus’-one of my all-time favorite albums-performed by one of my favorite bands. Alas, I wasn’t there (I had a ticket but the aforementioned move to Texas prevented me from attending). I sold my ticket, and I like to think that even though I missed the show, maybe whoever took my place was more deserving.
After all, I already know and love Little Feat, but maybe the person who took my ticket didn’t. And maybe, just maybe, they loved it. And maybe they went out when they got back from the show and they bought their own copy of “Waiting For Columbus”, and they sat at home and soaked in the laid-back, swampy funky soulful slinky groove that is Little Feat. Maybe they found that Lowell George wasn’t just singing to anyone, he was singing RIGHT TO THEM. Maybe they felt they had discovered something amazing, something they couldn’t believe they’d lived without for so long, something that filled every little empty musical niche in their lives, and they went out and bought even more Little Feat albums, and soon they’ll have so many that they lend them to their friends, and the process starts all over, and before you know it, everyone in America is finally listening to Little Feat.

Wouldn’t that be great?

Here’s Rock ‘n Roll Doctor, a very deceptive song in that it grooves and is very danceable, but upon closer inspection is very rhythmically dense, changing time signatures almost every measure and never ever settling on a consistent meter. It’s part of Little Feat’s genius that they make something so very very difficult sound so easy and smooth.

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Posted in Forgotten Music, Underplayed Music on November 4th, 2010 by eddielehwald –

Prince – Rasberry Beret

A little secret about Your Daily Song Fix – We don’t turn down Prince requests! Shout out to Jon Cylus for the selection.

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Posted in Forgotten Music, Unknown Songs on June 22nd, 2010 by Tony Amoyal –

Bill Withers – Harlem

Bill WithersBill Withers was the last of six children born on July 4, 1938, in Slab Fork, West Virginia. He was the only man in his family who did not end up working in the coal mines of West Virginia.  Instead, he enlisted in the US Navy and became interested in writing and singing songs while stationed in Guam.  In 1967, after being discharged, he moved to Los Angeles to pursue his music career. As a self-proclaimed untrained musician, he became known for his story-telling ability and most of his early recordings did not feature a traditional song structure.  “Harlem” does not have a chorus; instead, each verse escalates in a crescendo as the song progresses. Withers uses this structure to build tension and compliment the story he’s telling in his lyrics.

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Posted in Forgotten Music, Unknown Songs on June 17th, 2010 by Denis –

Dynamic Tints & Pieces of Peace-Be My Lady

If a man writes this song for you and you don’t fall in love with him your heart is made of stone. The Chicago-based group Pieces of Peace is also, almost certainly, the only band to ever be created in Chicago and disband in Singapore.

"Why would you deny me?"

If you’ve made it to Singapore as a band you’ve probably done something right, or have you?

I love my Dap Kings and my Amy Winehouse but sometimes there is nothing like the real deal.  This is song is 1960s soul that melts your heart and reminds you that you have to treat your lady right.

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Posted in Forgotten Music, Underplayed Music, Unknown Songs on May 26th, 2010 by Sean –

Sam Cooke – Having a Party

Sam CookeSam Cooke began his career singing gospel, first with siblings and later as part of other various groups through the early 1950s.  In the second half of that decade, Cooke transitioned to pop music, releasing “Lovable,” his first pop single in 1956.  “Having a Party” was recorded in 1961 under his own record label after he had gained significant notoriety.  The studio version of this song features Cooke’s clear, soothing voice; something he carried over from his gospel days and a quality his fans adored him for.  The live version of the song appeared on “Live at the Harlem Square Club,” recorded in 1963, just one year before his controversial death in December, 1964.  In this live cut, a coarseness can be clearly heard in Cooke’s voice, probably as the result of time spent touring and performing live shows.  This grittier version of the song exemplifies something closer to rock and roll, and captures Sam Cooke’s true versatility as a singer and performer.

Studio version:

Live version:

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Posted in Forgotten Music, Underplayed Music on May 6th, 2010 by Denis –